Hello World in Morse code on Raspberry Pi

Watch out! This tutorial is over 2 years old. Please keep this in mind as some code snippets provided may no longer work or need modification to work on current systems.

Somebody posted a tutorial on YouTube showing a LED blinking”hello world” in Morse code using a Raspberry Pi.  However, they only show the code executing, not how it was put together. They also don’t show the hardware setup 🙁

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Port Scanner in Python

Watch out! This tutorial is over 2 years old. Please keep this in mind as some code snippets provided may no longer work or need modification to work on current systems.

This post will show how you can make a small and easy-to-use port scanner program written in Python. There are many ways of doing this with Python, but we’re going to do it using the built-in module Socket.

Do not run programs like this one against servers in the college. Behaviour like this could be seen as malicious and get you suspended!

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Use Google’s Copy Of JQuery in WordPress

Watch out! This tutorial is over 2 years old. Please keep this in mind as some code snippets provided may no longer work or need modification to work on current systems.

Grabs jQuery from Google’s CDN which your visitors will hopefully have cached. This can then be called in your header with <?php wp_enqueue_script("jquery"); ?>

 

Hello World in Python

Watch out! This tutorial is over 2 years old. Please keep this in mind as some code snippets provided may no longer work or need modification to work on current systems.

This is how you would display “Hello World” in Python.

Android Hello World

Watch out! This tutorial is over 2 years old. Please keep this in mind as some code snippets provided may no longer work or need modification to work on current systems.

Before you start writing your first example using Android SDK, you have to make sure that you have set-up your Android development environment properly. We also assume that you have a little bit working knowledge with Android Studio from class.

So let us proceed to write a simple Android Application which will print “Hello World!”.

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A “Hello, World” HTML document

Watch out! This tutorial is over 2 years old. Please keep this in mind as some code snippets provided may no longer work or need modification to work on current systems.

You create a file and put special character sequences called HTML elements into your file. These elements identify the structural parts of your document. When a Web browser displays the file, it will display your file’s content, but not the characters that make up the structure.

Here is an example:

Only the elements that you place in the BODY element (that is, between <BODY> and </BODY> ) ever get displayed in a Web browser’s window.

In this example, only the contents of the H1 element (between <H1> and </H1> ) and the P element (between <P> and </P> ) are displayed.

Hello World in C++

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This is how you would display “Hello World” in C++.

 

Hello World in C#

Watch out! This tutorial is over 2 years old. Please keep this in mind as some code snippets provided may no longer work or need modification to work on current systems.

This is how you would display “Hello World” in C#.

Hello World in Visual Basic .NET

Watch out! This tutorial is over 2 years old. Please keep this in mind as some code snippets provided may no longer work or need modification to work on current systems.

This is how you would display “Hello World” in Visual Basic.

The command line for compiling the program is the following:

In the previous line, /out specifies the output file, and /t indicates the target type.

Hello World in Java

Watch out! This tutorial is over 2 years old. Please keep this in mind as some code snippets provided may no longer work or need modification to work on current systems.

This is how you would display “Hello World” in your Java application.

We break the process of programming in Java into three steps:

  • Create the program by typing it into a text editor and saving it to a file named, say, HelloWorld.java.
  • Compile it by typing “javac HelloWorld.java” in the terminal window.
  • Execute (or run) it by typing “java HelloWorld” in the terminal window.

So, the code in our file would look like

To compile HelloWorld.java type the text below at the terminal

Once you compile your program, you can execute it. This is the exciting part, where the computer follows your instructions. To run the HelloWorld program, type the following in the terminal window:

That’s it!